Chicken Terriyaki and Chawanmushi Recipe

Got this from japaneserecipes.com. Had it for dinner last night with grilled eggplant. It was great!



Chicken Terriyaki
Ingredients:
    •    3/4 pounds chicken breasts or thighs
    •    2 Tbsp sake (rice wine)
    •    4 Tbsp soy sauce
    •    4 Tbsp mirin (sweet rice wine)
    •    2 Tbsp sugar
    •    grated/chopped ginger
    •    grated/chopped garlic
Preparation:
Poke chicken using a fork. Mix other ingredients in a bowl. Marinate the chicken in the mixture for 15 minutes in the refrigerator. Heat some vegetable oil in a frying pan. First, fry the skin side of the chicken on medium heat until the skin is browned. Turn the chicken over to fry the other side on low heat. Pour the sauce used to marinate chicken in the pan. Cover the pan and steam cook the chicken on low heat until done. Remove the lid and simmer until the sauce becomes thick. Stop the heat. Slice the chicken and serve on a plate. Pour thickened sauce over the teriyaki chicken. Garnish with grated ginger if you would like.




Chawanmushi

Ingredients:
    •    3 eggs
    •    1 1/2 cup dashi soup stock (or 1 1/2 c hot water + 2 tsp dashi granules)
    •    1/2 tsp salt
    •    1 tsp soy sauce
    •    1 tsp sugar
    •    1 tsp sake
    •    1 chicken thigh, cut into bite-size pieces
    •    4 shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced, or 1/4 enoki mushrooms, chopped
    •    1 oz. mitsuba (trefoil) - optional
    •    8 slices kamaboko or narutomaki fish cakes - optional

Preparation:
Lightly beat eggs in a bowl. Try not to bubble the eggs. Add cool dashi soup stock, soy sauce, salt, sake, and sugar in the egg. Strain the egg mixture. Put shiitake, chicken, and kamaboko or narutomaki in four chawanmushi cups, or tea cups. Fill each cup to third-forths full with the egg mixture. Place mitsuba leaves on top of the egg mixture. Cover the cups. Preheat a steamer on high heat. Turn down the heat to low and carefully place cups in the steamer. Steam for about 15 minutes. Poke the custard with a bamboo stick. If clear soup comes out, it's cooked.